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Samurai Archives Wiki; Updates on the Wiki
Topic Started: May 10 2015, 07:31 AM (2,612 Views)
Toranosuke
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Tosa no kami
I thought I might start a thread for talking about the Samurai Archives Wiki, and just posting updates every now and then, as to my own contributions there.

So, just to start off, for whatever it's worth, if anyone's interested, I've been working my way through the Shimazu clan biographies. I've just completed doing bios for all of the Edo period daimyo of Satsuma domain, and will continue moving backwards - I'm mainly working on people who I have some image to include, mainly graves from the Shimazu clan graveyard at Fukushô-ji, in Kagoshima, which I was fortunate to visit last year, and I am mainly working from (at the moment) simple online resources such as https://kotobank.jp/ (which searches basic encyclopedias like the Nihon jinmei daijiten, Digital Daijisen, and Asahi Nihon rekishi jinbutsu jiten), and bios on the Shôkoshûseikan official website. I'm also reading through stuff on Satsuma & Ryukyu, and including those things where I come across it, but sadly I think it's going to be a little while before I get to really delve into the piles of Satsuma history books I bought last summer.

Anyway, so that's about it for the moment - Edo period daimyo of Satsuma complete, and more Shimazu bios on the way, along with various other topics at random, depending on whatever I happen to be reading, or which portion of my photos I end up working from on a given day.

There are a handful of people authorized to contribute directly on the Wiki, but if anyone else has information to be added, or notices mistakes to be fixed, please do let me know. Thanks!
Edited by Toranosuke, May 10 2015, 07:32 AM.
上り口説 Nubui Kuduchi – Musings on the arts of Japan and beyond
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kitsuno
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The Shogun

Great job on the wiki!
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Toranosuke
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Working from a thin (15 page) exhibit catalog entitled Naha shizoku no isshô (那覇士族の一生), put out by the Naha City Museum of History, I have now done a handful of entries on the Bai family, a sample example family of Naha scholar-bureaucrats.

It was certainly interesting, during putting together these entries, to learn a lot more about the posts Ryukyuan scholar-bureaucrats might hold, and how they rotated through them (typically holding a given post for only one- or two-year terms). However, I remain insufficiently clear on the names and titles - particularly how to read them - and though the Japanese Wikipedia provides a handy chart, I do not yet have a solid grasp for myself on how all the Ryukyuan court ranks & titles work. My own Samurai-Archives Wiki entry on Ryukyuan court ranks, drawing mainly on Mitsugu Matsuda's The Government of the Kingdom of Ryukyu, 1609-1872, is perhaps simpler to follow, but is clearly only a start. As I went through the year-by-year biographies of the members of the Bai family, seeing as they were raised in rank, I realized quickly it's not just a system of numbered ranks (Junior Ninth Rank, Senior Sixth Rank), combined with a simple set of titles (chikudun, peechin), and colored court caps. Within those nine ranks - or eighteen, if you include Junior 従 and Senior 正 - there are so many titles, like chikudun zashiki 筑登之座敷, zashiki 座敷, setô zashiki 勢頭座敷, with at least one member of the Bai family moving up as high as 申口座 (moushi kuchi za?).

So, this is something I'm going to have to get a handle on for my own interest, and my own research. I hope you might find it interesting, too, though I know Ryukyu's a whole world unto itself in many ways. I think at some point in the next few days I'd like to go through the introduction to Shunzo Sakamaki's book on Ryukyuan Names. I certainly have some sense of this already; for example, a particular member of the Tei 鄭 family might have the Chinese-style name Tei Dô 鄭迵, and the aristocratic title Jana ueekata (or, ueekata of Jana, much like a samurai might be Satsuma-no-kami or Ise-no-kami) 謝名親方. But then, this same figure also has the name Rizan 利山. And, perhaps most curious and unclear to me is which of these names would have been pronounced in a Japanese, Chinese, or Okinawan way. Japanese scholarship generally presents everything in Japanese readings, even things that are fully foreign (e.g. 毛沢東 as もう たくとう or マオ・ツォートン, but never as anything like Máo Zédōng more closely resembling what we would take as English-speakers at least to be a fuller, closer, indication of the pronunciation, with tones) - and English-language scholarship on Ryukyu is few and far between. So, if we have a figure like Bai Ien 貝唯延, would it have ever been Bai Ien? Or is it Bèi Wéiyán? And is the Ien or Wéiyán like the Dô in Tei Dô, or like the Rizan in Tei Dô Jana ueekata Rizan? Maybe I'm getting too deeply into my own concerns, for which I apologize, but for my own dissertation, I'm hoping to try to represent the names "properly" as the Ryukyuans themselves would have used them, as best as I can, avoiding the Japanization of names wherever inappropriate; yet, if I don't know whether they used the Chinese pronunciation, or a native Okinawan pronunciation... this goes for many titles and posts, too. Is 楽童子 "gakudôji" or yuè tóngzǐ, or some Okinawan pronunciation that I don't know?

In any case, of some tangential relevance to our ongoing forum discussion on the complexities of Japanese names, I hope to post a Wiki article soon on at least some of the basics of how Ryukyuan names worked. Cheers.

and see if I can get a clearer sense of just which names and titles are which, and sort of how they work.
Edited by Toranosuke, Jun 20 2015, 10:49 AM.
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Bethetsu
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Ganbatte kudasai!
Didn't Perry visit? Are there any records of names or titles? That might tell you about the pronounciation then.
Edited by Bethetsu, Jun 20 2015, 12:26 PM.
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Toranosuke
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Thanks! That's a good thought. Of course, the names and terms are going to be mangled, as they always are in such things, but still, it's a good comparative alternative to relying on only Japanese sources.

In the meantime, I've begun a rough draft of a Wiki entry on Ryukyuan names.
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JapanThis
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Cool! Thanks for all your hard work.
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Toranosuke
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I am now making my way through Ryûkyû shisha no Edo nobori 琉球使者の江戸上り, by Miyagi Eishô 宮城栄昌 (Daiichi Shobô, 1982), as part of my research. As I do so, I'm adding articles on Kagoshima temples, Ryukyuan scholar-bureaucrats, and whatever else I come across.

Some of my most recent additions thus include:
*The Kagoshima temples and shrines Jinnôdô, Nanzen-in, and Jôkômyô-ji
*The Ryukyuan figures Tei Genkin, Misato Ankô, Oroku Ryôkyô, Oroku Ryôei, Tazato Anshû, Mô Kokutei, King Shô Kô, Goeku Chôsei, Kunjan Seisoku, Chatan Chôshû, and Tamagusuku Chôchi
*The newly-named World Heritage Site Iso Ijinkan, and the closely associated Iso Cotton Mill
*Two sites related to Ryukyuan pottery: Wakuta, and the Aragaki house
*Spanish silver dollars
*Edo period Ezo explorer Mamiya Rinzô
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Toranosuke
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I've just put up a very incomplete draft of an article on the huge topic of Graves. Do you think the Wiki article should be renamed "Burial practices", or some other title?

Other recent additions include:
*Kokugaku scholar Matsuda Naoe
*Pioneers of Okinawan Studies Katô Sango, Orikuchi Shinobu, and Ifa Fuyu
*Nihonga painter & sonnô jôi adherent Okamoto Tôri
*Saga-bon, an early form of woodblock printed books
*The Noh plays Arashiyama, Ama, Uto, and Ryôko
*The monks Ryôô and Jikai, and the artist Ogata Kenzan, to whom there are memorials at Kan'ei-ji.
*A very stubby article on Kusatsu, one of the 53 stations of the Tokaido. Maybe someday we'll get all 53.
*Rakugo performer Sakuragawa Jihinari
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kitsuno
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The Shogun

Yeah, probably title it "Burial Practices" and have "Graves" redirect to it.
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Toranosuke
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I continue to go through my photos from various trips to Japan (and elsewhere), and to create Wiki articles based on museum exhibits, historical plaques, and the like. As a result, some of the newest articles on the Wiki include:

From plaques at Sakuragichô Station in Yokohama - the original Yokohama Station, and one of the very first railroad stations in Japan:
*Edmund Morel
*Inoue Masaru
*Satô Masayoshi
*John Diack
*Masaki Toku
*Kanagawa-juku
*Tsurumi Station
*Yokohama Station
*Francis Henrry Trevithick

And, from other stuff:
*Ezra Pound
*Yevfimy Vasilyevich Putyatin
*Ginowan-udun tomb

And, because I'm currently reading upon Nihonmachi (Japantowns in early modern SE Asia):
*Kôrôkan
*Suetsugu Kozen
*Ayutthaya
*Manila
Edited by Toranosuke, Sep 25 2015, 02:33 PM.
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Toranosuke
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For all those interested (*cricket chirp* *cricket*), the latest set of developments on the Wiki includes brief articles for all nineteen of the young men from Satsuma who snuck out of the country and traveled to Europe to study in 1865. See "Satsuma students" on the Wiki.

In the course of doing these articles, I've also added a number of kanji articles for surnames.

Other new articles can always be found automatically listed on the Wiki here
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Toranosuke
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In addition to some other stuff I've been working on lately, I've now created pages for the Kamakura period, and for the city of Kamakura itself.

Kamakura was our third most-linked-to page that did not yet have a page actually created. Due to my personal bias towards Ryukyuan history, Shuri (royal capital of the Ryukyu Kingdom) is second on that list. I'll be creating a page for that very soon, since I happen to have found a guide pamphlet from the last time I was there. The most linked-to topic on our Wiki that still doesn't have a page, though, is the Meiji period. We're approaching 6000 articles, so I figure the 6000th one will be either "Meiji period" or "Samurai." That is, unless I accidentally blow through 6000 while working on random other things..
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Toranosuke
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Just in time for the New Year, the Samurai Archives Wiki has now reached 6000 articles!

The 6000th article is one on the Meiji period. It is by far the most linked to article that did not yet exist on the Wiki, with nearly 300 links. What I have created now is quite stubby - really just an extremely rough first start, to get the ball rolling and to secure that 6000th article spot - but I will be expanding and polishing in coming days.

I have been reading a lot about Satsuma lately, so a lot of the newest articles created as we began to approach 6000 have been articles related to Satsuma. They cover a range of topics from Shimazu lords and Shimazu retainers to cities, battles, and so forth. I have also been reading about Japanese activity in 16th-17th century Southeast Asia, so there have been a number of articles on that. The most recent 5-10 articles or so cover Dutch and English men who settled in Japan in the early 17th century, since I have been reading Gary Leupp's book on "Interracial Intimacy" for my work lately.

And that's it, I guess, for now. Feeling really good about filling in some of these gaps (we now have an article for Jan Joosten!). The big one, the Meiji period article, is started, and will be growing soon.
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kitsuno
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The Shogun

Awesome, thanks for the work.
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Toranosuke
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The 6500th article on the S-A Wiki is a rather short, stubby one, I'm afraid, but like so much else on the Wiki (from the very beginning), it's on a topic (in this case a person) about whom there is basically nowhere else in English online to learn about it at all.

The 6500th article is on Hanagusuku Anshô, one of many minor Ryukyuan scholar-officials I have come across in my research.
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Toranosuke
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Been a little while since I've posted here, so I figure I may as well share a little bit of an update. As always, most of my work on the Wiki comes from a combination of whatever I've been reading, and from photos I've taken (e.g. at museums, historical sites around Tokyo, etc).

As I'm currently reading through a series of kafu 家譜 (official Ryukyu government genealogies of the scholar-bureaucracy), I've added a number of very brief articles on individual Ryukyuan figures. I know this might seem quite niche for many of you, but I think it's something to aim for, that our Wiki - even more so than Wikipedia - might be the only (or the best) source of information in English for some of these topics, even if they are quite niche and obscure.

Some of these new articles include:
*Shô Chôkyô, a member of the 1764 Ryukyuan mission to Edo.
*Shô Wa, the head of that 1764 mission.
*Ba Ryôki, another member of the 1764 mission.
*Kin Yûka, court musician.
*Shô Chôri, lead envoy on the 1748 mission.
*Mô Chishi and Mô Shin'i, who trained musicians for the Edo missions.
*Kushi Anshô, member of the 1796 and 1806 missions.

I've also written up some short articles on:
*The Shimabara jinzu byôbu, reportedly the only extant painting of a samurai procession marching off to battle (rather than marching in a more ceremonial context)
*Jan Pieterzoon Coen and Pieter Nuyts, two notable Dutch East India Company officials (I started reading Adam Clulow's excellent book The Company and the Shogun, but ran into sections that are not included free on Google Books, so now I'm waiting until I can get a real copy)
*A rough start to an article on the Tôkaidô, which we never had an article on all this time.
*One on Ueno Tôshôgû, which was under construction/renovation the last time I was in Japan, and is now all nice and shiny. Definitely worth checking it out if you're ever in the area.
*Sengoku Hisatoshi, a small-time 19th century daimyô of a small domain, but who has left excellent records of his audiences with the shogun.
*Hanegawa Tôei, an ukiyo-e artist who produced one very famous painting, but about whom almost nothing is known.
*And, a very brief start to an article on Ogata Kôrin, one of the most prominent of Edo period painters, for whom we never yet had an article.

Only at 6,665 right now, but we're inching forwards towards 7,000!
Edited by Toranosuke, Jun 22 2017, 01:41 AM.
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Toranosuke
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These last few weeks, I've read two rather interesting things: one, an academic article (book chapter, really) by Cecilia Segawa Seigle, “Tokugawa Tsunayoshi and the Formation of Edo Castle Rituals of Giving,” in Martha Chaiklin (ed.), Mediated by Gifts: Politics and Society in Japan 1350-1850, Brill (2017), and the other, an annotated transcription of Satsuyû kikô 薩遊紀行, an 1810 travel diary. Both spurred a number of new Wiki articles which I thought might be of interest to folks here:

*Tsuru-hime, a daughter of Tokugawa Tsunayoshi, and wife to Tokugawa Tsunanori of Kishû
*Tone-hime, a daughter of Tokugawa Munenao, and wife of Date Munemura.
*Arisugawa Tadahito, a court noble who was betrothed to a daughter of Shogun Tsunayoshi
*Matsu-hime, a daughter of Tokugawa Yoshimune, who was married to Maeda Yoshinori
*Hôshin-in, concubine to Shogun Ienobu and mother to his first son
*Date Tadamune, heir to Date Masamune

*Ki no Yukihira, a Kamakura period swordsmith
*Chujô-hime, an 8th c. court lady renowned for her Buddhist virtue.
*Karasumaru Mitsuhiro, a court noble with close connections to Hosokawa Fujitaka
*Terasaka Kichiemon, one of the 47 Ronin.
*the Great Tenmei Fire which destroyed most of Kyoto in 1788
*Kikaigashima, an island south of Kyushu where a number of notable historical figures were exiled
*the Kinshi-roku kuzure Incident, in which Shimazu Shigehide forced Shimazu Narinobu to abdicate, and had some 50-100 retainers either exiled or killed (or ordered to commit suicide)
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Toranosuke
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I try to save landmark numbers for big posts. This time, I miscounted a little, so our 7000th wiki article is a very short one on the Donggak Tonggam, a 15th century official history of Korea.

But, our 7001st is on Yokohama, interestingly for a very long time the article most linked to which didn't yet exist, beating out even "samurai." The Yokohama article as it stands right now is only a start, but it'll get more fleshed out as time goes on.

Meanwhile, some other recently new articles include:
*Government of the Ryukyu Kingdom
*Ryukyu kankei monjo (a collection of historical documents relating to Ryûkyû)
*Articles on the Heian/Kamakura/Muromachi period emperors Heizei, Saga, Juntoku, and Go-Kameyama
*Empresses & imperial princesses Bifukumon-in, Hachijô-in, Taikenmon-in, Kôkamon-in, and Sen'yômon-in
*Edo period writer Asai Ryôi
*Tea masters Kamiya Sôtan, Sen Sôtan, Furuta Oribe, and Katagiri Sekishû
*The Ôoku
*Ii Yachiyo, daughter of Ii Naosuke
*August Pfizmaier, translator of the first publication of any piece of Japanese literature in a European language
*Asakawa Kan'ichi, pioneer of Japanese Studies in the US.
*Ôtomo Nata "Jezebel", the actively anti-Christian first wife of Ôtomo Sôrin
*and, everyone's favorite war god, Hachiman, who I kind of can't believe hadn't had an article until now.
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