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Meiji at 150 Podcast
Topic Started: May 8 2018, 08:57 PM (88 Views)
Toranosuke
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Tosa no kami
I don't know if this has been posted about already, but if you're not listening to the Meiji at 150 Podcast being put out by Tristan Grunow with the support of various groups at UBC, you are missing out.

https://meijiat150.arts.ubc.ca/podcast/

I've only listened to a few episodes so far, but I've been thoroughly enjoying hearing from many different scholars of Japanese history, talking about various different aspects of the significance of the Meiji Restoration.

The first episode is probably a particularly nice place to start - not just because it's first, but because Thomas Conlan starts us out by talking about the place or significance of the Meiji Restoration in Japanese history as a whole, and how he approaches teaching the subject in his undergraduate classes.

Later episodes are an absolute who's who of historians of Japan, including conversations with Kate McDonald, Rebecca Corbett, Peter Nosco, Kenneth Ruoff, Ignacio Adriasola on "modern art" in the Meiji period, David Howell, Marcia Yonemoto, Peter Kornicki, Amy Stanley... and, upcoming: Daniel Botsman, Helen Hardacre, Laura Nenzi, and Robert Hellyer, among others.
上り口説 Nubui Kuduchi – Musings on the arts of Japan and beyond
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Sam
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Artisan
Thanks for bringing this to everyone's attention. To what extent do the people in the podcast assume knowledge of (late) Edo era Japanese history? I will listen anyway but I am wondering how technical it gets beyond the first episode.
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Toranosuke
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Tosa no kami
I think the podcast does assume some basic knowledge - they won't explain who the Tokugawa are, or when the Tokugawa period was. They might mention Tokugawa Yoshinobu as the last shogun, without explaining out further details about who he was otherwise. ... But, I think if you know the basics, you should be good.

I am by no means an expert in the fine details of the ins-and-outs of precisely what happened month-by-month or even year-by-year in Bakumatsu into Meiji, or who exactly the Shinsengumi were, or even which big-name figures were necessarily on which side of the ideological (and later outright political and physical) conflict... But, as long as you know the general outlines of the history, I think you should be okay.
上り口説 Nubui Kuduchi – Musings on the arts of Japan and beyond
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