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Sato... Naokata or Naotaka?
Topic Started: Dec 3 2017, 11:42 AM (339 Views)
kitsuno
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The Shogun

I'm looking at confucian critiques of the 47 Ronin, and find that one of the main comentators might have had his name misspelled all over the place. Can I get an official answer - is it Sato Naokata or Sato Naotaka? I'm leaning towards Naokata since most JSTOR articles have him listed as that, but there are a lot of things that have him listed as Naotaka. Unless he used both names?
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kitsuno
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The Shogun

Well, here's another one. Some sources say that it was Kajiwara Yasobei who witnessed Asano Naganori's attack on Kira, others say it was Kajikawa Yosobei. In this case I'm leaning towards Kajikawa, again based on JSTOR. Anyone have an insight on either of the two?
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ltdomer98
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kitsuno
Dec 3 2017, 11:42 AM
I'm looking at confucian critiques of the 47 Ronin, and find that one of the main comentators might have had his name misspelled all over the place. Can I get an official answer - is it Sato Naokata or Sato Naotaka? I'm leaning towards Naokata since most JSTOR articles have him listed as that, but there are a lot of things that have him listed as Naotaka. Unless he used both names?




国史大辞典:
Quote:
 

佐藤直方
さとうなおかた

一六五〇 - 一七一九
江戸時代中期の儒学者。名は直方、通称は五郎左衛門。


Nothing comes up in any of my Jinmei jiten online for a "NaoTaka." NaoKata (copied above) fits the time, and he's an intellectual/scholar, though it doesn't say anything specific to his thoughts on the Ako incident, it does reference his thoughts on a similar incident.


kitsuno
Dec 4 2017, 10:13 AM
Well, here's another one. Some sources say that it was Kajiwara Yasobei who witnessed Asano Naganori's attack on Kira, others say it was Kajikawa Yosobei. In this case I'm leaning towards Kajikawa, again based on JSTOR. Anyone have an insight on either of the two?



Neither of these come up with hits that fit, but Kajiwara comes up with way more possibilities than Kajikawa.
Edited by ltdomer98, Dec 4 2017, 12:57 PM.
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kitsuno
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The Shogun

That's him, the dates of birth match up. 佐藤直方 it is.

ltdomer98
Dec 4 2017, 12:56 PM


Neither of these come up with hits that fit, but Kajiwara comes up with way more possibilities than Kajikawa.


Interesting. The JSTOR articles that come up with him specifically have him listed as Kajikawa. But Turnbull lists him as Kajiwara.
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ltdomer98
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kitsuno
Dec 4 2017, 05:48 PM
Interesting. The JSTOR articles that come up with him specifically have him listed as Kajikawa. But Turnbull lists him as Kajiwara.


I think you know which to trust.
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Kurogami
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kitsuno
Dec 4 2017, 10:13 AM
Well, here's another one. Some sources say that it was Kajiwara Yasobei who witnessed Asano Naganori's attack on Kira, others say it was Kajikawa Yosobei. In this case I'm leaning towards Kajikawa, again based on JSTOR. Anyone have an insight on either of the two?
赤穂義人纂書. 第2巻之9−18 / Commentary (?) on the Loyal Men of Ako, Nbr 2, Vol 9-18. I don't think this text is available online, but the National Diet Library shows this entry in the Contents: 梶川氏筆記梶川頼照 / 267p (0137.jp2), Kajikawa Clan Record - Kajikawa Yoriteru, aka 梶川与惣兵衛 / Kajikawa Yosobee
"You've never seen a person chop wood before?"
"Oh yes, but you seem to enjoy it so"
"Ah, that's just my nature. Sorry if it offends you."
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Kurogami
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kitsuno
Dec 3 2017, 11:42 AM
I'm looking at confucian critiques of the 47 Ronin, and find that one of the main comentators might have had his name misspelled all over the place. Can I get an official answer - is it Sato Naokata or Sato Naotaka? I'm leaning towards Naokata since most JSTOR articles have him listed as that, but there are a lot of things that have him listed as Naotaka. Unless he used both names?
I realize this is probably too late, I just found it a couple days ago...nonetheless, Sources of Japanese Tradition, Vol. 2, has a section devoted to commentaries on the Ako Ronin. Included is the chapter, "Notes on the Forty-six Men" by Satō Naokata.

Sources of Japanese Tradition: Volume 2, 1600 to 2000 (Introduction to Asian Civilizations), de Bary, Wm. Theodore, ed., Columbia University Press.
"You've never seen a person chop wood before?"
"Oh yes, but you seem to enjoy it so"
"Ah, that's just my nature. Sorry if it offends you."
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