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Routledge Handbook of Premodern Japanese History (ed. Karl Friday)
Topic Started: Jul 2 2017, 06:49 AM (904 Views)
Sam
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Link: https://www.routledge.com/Routledge-Handbook-of-Premodern-Japanese-History/Friday/p/book/9780415707022

Quote:
 
About the Book

Scholarship on premodern Japan has grown spectacularly over the past four decades, in terms of both sophistication and volume. A new approach has developed, marked by a higher reliance on primary documents, a shift away from the history of elites to broader explorations of social structures, and a re-examination of many key assumptions. As a result, the picture of the early Japanese past now taught by specialists differs radically from the one that was current in the mid-twentieth century.

This handbook offers a comprehensive historiographical review of Japanese history up until the 1500s. Featuring chapters by leading historians and covering the early Jōmon, Yayoi, Kofun, Nara, and Heian eras, as well as the later medieval periods, each section provides a foundational grasp of the major themes in premodern Japan. The sections will include:
  • Geography and the environment
  • Political events and institutions
  • Society and culture
  • Economy and technology
The Routledge Handbook of Premodern Japanese History is an essential reference work for students and scholars of Japanese, Asian, and World History.
Quote:
 
Table of Contents

Introduction, Karl F. Friday

Part I. Geography and the Environment

1. Geography in History and History in Geography, Fujita Hirotsugu, translated by David Eason

2. Climate and Environment in History, Bruce L .Batten

3: Classical Japan and the Continent, Douglas S. Fuqua

Part II. Political Events and Institutions

4. The Jōmon and Yayoi: Premodern to Hypermodern, Simon Kaner

5. The Kofun Era and Early State Formation, Ken’ichi Sasaki

6. The Ritsuryō State, Sakaue Yasutoshi, with Kristopher L. Reeves

7. From Classical to Medieval? Ōchō Kokka, Kenmon Taisei, and the Heian Court, Mikael S. Adolphson

8. The Court and Its Provinces: Producing and Distributing Wealth in Classical Society, 700–1200, Detlev Taranczewski

9. Court and Countryside 1200-1600: The Articulation of Local Autonomy, Peter D. Shapinsky

10. The Imperial Court in Medieval Japan, Lee Butler

11. The Sixteenth Century: Identifying a New Group of "Unifiers" & Reevaluating the Myth of "Reunification", Jeffrey Yoshio Kurashige

Part III. Society and Culture

12. Religion in Archaic Japan, William E. Deal

13. Gender and Family in the Archaic and Classical Ages, Ijūin Yōko, with Sachiko Kawai

14. Heian-kyō: from Royal Center to Metropole, Joan R. Piggott

15. Religion in Nara and Heian Japan, Mikaël Bauer

16. The Historical Demography of Japan to 1700, William Wayne Farris

17. Village and Rural Life in Medieval Japan, Pierre F. Souyri

18. Family, Women, and Gender in Medieval Society, Hitomi Tonomura

19. Outcasts and Marginals In Medieval Japan, Janet R. Goodwin

20. Medieval Warriors and Warfare, Kawai Yasushi, with Karl F. Friday

21. Religion in Medieval Japan, Brian Ruppert

Part IV. Economy and Technology

22. Coins and Commerce in Classical Japan, Mikami Yoshitaka, with Joshua Batts

23. Knowledge of Nature and Craft: Researching the History of Science, Mathematics, and Technology in Japan before 1600, Kristina Buhrman

24. Agriculture and Food Production, Charlotte von Verschuer

25. Commerce and Towns in Medieval Japan, Suzanne Gay
Thanks to Samurai Archives I actually recognize some of the names here! Also decided to post in this forum rather than kamakura-sengoku one because that forum gets a lot of traffic and this one doesn't.
Edited by Sam, Jul 2 2017, 06:59 AM.
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Toranosuke
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Nagato no kami
Sweet. This looks quite good!

Looking forward to seeing it in person. Shame it's so absurdly expensive, though :/ (what else is new?)
上り口説 Nubui Kuduchi – Musings on the arts of Japan and beyond
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ltdomer98
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Daijo Daijin

That price point is REALLY disappointing. It appears to be an update/perhaps more sophisticated version of "Japan Emerging," also edited by Friday. Meaning I'd want to assign it to students as a textbook, particularly if it's a bit more in-depth than JE. But even if a school bookstore got it for less than the $220 (and they usually do), that's still a pricey book for an undergrad. I'd probably read it (I'll talk to our librarian to get it, of course) and then select a chapter or two that I can give students as a handout, but it's a shame I couldn't use the whole thing.

This is one of the reasons why I hesitate to publish with Routledge, even though I've had a tentative offer. Sigh.
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Sam
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Nate
 
That price point is REALLY disappointing. It appears to be an update/perhaps more sophisticated version of "Japan Emerging," also edited by Friday. Meaning I'd want to assign it to students as a textbook, particularly if it's a bit more in-depth than JE. But even if a school bookstore got it for less than the $220 (and they usually do), that's still a pricey book for an undergrad. I'd probably read it (I'll talk to our librarian to get it, of course) and then select a chapter or two that I can give students as a handout, but it's a shame I couldn't use the whole thing.
The price is explained by the fact that this is considered a reference book and not a textbook (they think their customers are university libraries plus a small number of scholars so in order to make some money they have to hike the price). But I do agree with you about textbooks in general, when I was teaching as a graduate student I was very much against assigning expensive (and often heavy) textbooks. I was in favor of creating our own textbooks which anyone could use for free (this had been done for some courses but not all).
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ltdomer98
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Daijo Daijin

Uh, gee, thanks for explaining me Routledge's pricing strategy. I had no idea. Next you'll tell me the same thing about Brill. :P
Edited by ltdomer98, Jul 11 2017, 12:30 PM.
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Sam
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Nate
 
That price point is REALLY disappointing
Nate
 
Uh, gee, thanks for explaining me Routledge's pricing strategy. I had no idea. Next you'll tell me the same thing about Brill.
The sarcasm in the second quote does not fit with the dissatisfaction expressed in the first one.
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ltdomer98
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Daijo Daijin

It fits perfectly fine. One can understand the process and still be disappointed in the price point. What one cannot do is attempt to sharpshoot people like a jackass and continue to expect people to respond. I posted a different response first to your rather pedantic and somewhat insulting response, and then edited it to tone it down, assuming I was reading a bit too much into it. Your last response tells me I was correct in my first instinct. Are you really suggesting that "haha, you caught me, I have no idea how publishers set their prices" is the response you expected? I could have responded with some arrogant response about my friend who is an editor for Routledge--I didn't. You didn't drop some super secret knowledge on us. Nor does that preclude any disappointment that I cannot use the resource in the manner I would wish. You can continue to attempt to play "gotcha" or whatever, if it makes you feel better. Enjoy your evening.
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Sam
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Based on your post I thought you did not know that the handbook is treated as a reference book (you were saying you wanted to assign it as a textbook to your students!) and therefore is expected to have low volume in sales. That is the only thing I commented on (did not even say Nate you are wrong to assign this, just said the publisher is categorizing it that way). I even agreed with your broader sentiment regarding the price increases in textbook that far outstrip the inflation. There is nothing disrespectful in what I wrote.

When did I say I imparted some hidden knowledge on anyone? I don't work in publishing, never have, don't have any friends in publishing either. Also I have not posted any gotcha posts. And why would I do it to you of all people?? Finally your were the first to condescend with that sarcastic comment after which I simply pointed out the first post that had lead me to my original comment.

All in all, I think you misread me, but stuff like that happens and that is life for you. I will close by saying, in case it is not obvious already, that I didn't mean to disrespect you.
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